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WYENOT NEWS - ROSS-ON-WYE
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Wyenot News - The Weekly News Magazine for Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire
Issue No. 169 - Wednesday, 17th October 2007
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IN THIS ISSUE
Page 1 [Why the news was late - Successful 'Open Art Surgery' at Nature's Choice]
Page 2 [Saturday evening with Will Killeen - Roy wins BBC Competition to make Ross Cider - Guided walk around Ross]
Page 3 [Filming at Symonds Yat - They're crafty folk at Fonteine Court - What's happening in Ross this week?]

Page 4

[Wild at the Doward - Nature Watch - JKHS Open Evening - Music Award - Police telephone disruption - Congrats]
Page 5 [Stabbing in Ross? - A Joint Family Birthday Celebration - Daylight robbery in Cawdor]
Page 6 [Heart Start - Recycling tip - VBL - Daz Fishing - Goodrich Football Kit - Rugby - Weather Station]
Page 7 [News from around Herefordshire]
HEREFORDSHIRE COUNTY NEWS

Have you a taste for adventure?

The Taste For Adventure Centre is a charity established in 1991 by Brummie Stokes MBE BEM ex SAS and third Briton to summit Mt. Everest. The charities goal is to empower the less privileged through the means of outdoor adventure. So far nearly 40'000 people have benefited from the great work the Taste For Adventure have done in the past sixteen years.

Now, over thirty years on from Brummie's Everest summit he has challenged the people of Hereford to face their fears and see Hereford like they have never seen it before, by completing an adrenalin packed 190ft abseil from the historic Hereford Cathedral. This is a unique opportunity which may never be repeated. All he asks is that you raise a minimum of £50 which will be spilt between The Taste For Adventure Centre, a local charity founded by Brummie who's aim is to enhance the lives of the disadvantaged by using the challenge of adventure, and Hereford Cathedral, who need money for their Fabric Fund.

This abseil is the start of a series of large events that will run as part of a goal to raise awareness and funds to put the next 40'000 individuals through the Taste For Adventure. Events will culminate with a team of six climbing the height of sea level to Everest summit in 24 hours on the centres climbing wall. The goal of the project is to raise as much money as possible to ensure Taste For Adventure can continue to provide the fantastic opportunities to the young, old, able or disabled amongst us.

Taking part in the abseil couldn't be easier:

  • Pick your time slot between 9am and 5:30pm
  • Register your time with Taste For Adventure and secure with a £30 deposit
  • Get fundraising to reach a minimum of £50!!! (including deposit)

There are only 50 places available so if you want to face your fear or just see Hereford how you've never seen it before register NOW!!

Call the Taste For Adventure Centre - 01432 761398 Email- Brummie@tasteforadventurecentre.co.uk.



Master composter in environment awards final

Sarah Blenkinsop from Ledbury at a composting clinic.

Master Composter Sarah Blenkinsop from Ledbury is through to the final of the Chartered Institute of Wastes Management (CIWM) Awards for Environmental Excellence, which are being held later this month in the category for Individual Recycling Champion of the Year.

These awards are intended to recognize the personal contribution of people outside the waste and resource management industry in encouraging the public to take part in managing resources and reducing or recycling waste. Judges are particularly looking for individuals who show leadership, imagination and innovation because they believe in a more sustainable lifestyle.

Herefordshire Council, in partnership with Worcestershire County Council, runs a Master Composters scheme which involves volunteers throughout the two counties giving up their time to promote home composting and sharing their knowledge with residents. Master Composters have been spreading the word about composting through a variety of activities, including visiting schools, attending local events, carrying out compost bin inspections for friends and neighbours, giving talks to local groups and holding composting roadshows.

Since April 2006 Sarah has devoted more than 225 hours to promoting composting across the two counties, significantly more than the suggested number of 30 hours per year. She has shown innovation and a massive level of self-motivation to organize her own promotional activities. During her time as a Master Composter, Sarah has spread the composting message to a large number of people, with a particular focus on work with her local school, Ashperton Primary in Ledbury. She has aimed to ensure that every single pupil knows what compost is, how to make it and what to do with the finished product.

When Sarah is not busy at school she doesn't forget about composting. None of her friends are safe and they often get engaged in conversations about composting over lunch. Sarah has also supported Herefordshire Council and Worcestershire County Council at their promotional events such as The Malvern Spring Gardening Show, Three Counties Show, Composting Clinics and composting roadshows held throughout the two counties. Sarah has also arranged and run a composting roadshow of her own at Somerfield in Ledbury.

Viktoria Salisbury, project development officer for composting, said, 'Our Master Composters are highly valued in our composting promotions and they all show massive enthusiasm. Sarah in particular has shown a great commitment to the scheme since it began in 2006 and because of this we felt it appropriate to put her forward for this award. We are very excited to have one of our volunteers get through to the finals of the awards and we are looking forward to attending the award ceremony at the end of October and hopefully winning the award for the category.'

The winner will be announced at the Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane, London, on Wednesday, 31st October and the ceremony is being hosted by BBC presenter Sophie Raworth.



Police offer £10,000 reward for vital information to solve 13 year old murder

A £10,000 reward for information leading to the detection of a 13 year old unsolved murder is being offered by West Mercia Constabulary. Officers reviewing the murder of Shropshire man Trevor Bradley have taken the unprecedented step of offering the reward to encourage the public to come forward with information that would close the case.

Trevor Bradley, 54, died 13 years ago. His body was found in his burned out car in a field close to the village of Melverley in north west Shropshire on 27th April 1994.

Mr Bradley lived in Ludlow and had strong connections with Shrewsbury, particularly in the Monkmoor area. He was also well known in Leominster, where he regularly visited a bingo hall. He travelled across Shropshire and neighbouring areas buying and selling antiques and bric-a-brac, trading in clocks, paintings, furniture and jewellery among other items.

Detective Inspector Andy Parsons, from the force's Major Investigation Unit, is leading the cold case review of Mr Bradley's death. 'Mr Bradley met his death in an horrific manner and his family deserve to see those responsible for his death brought to justice. We know some witnesses may have been reluctant to come forward with vital information because of certain loyalties, fear or mistrust of police at the time of his death. After 13 years, situations can change. I am convinced there are a number of people who have key information that could help the investigation team.'

'I would ask those people to examine their consciences now and come forward. I can assure them the support we can give key witnesses has improved significantly over the last decade. For all these reasons, I believe the time is now right to take the unusual step of offering a £10,000 reward. This reward is for information that leads to the conviction of the offender or offenders or which has a significant impact on the case'.

DI Parsons added,'The investigation team can be contacted directly by calling 01952 216444. For those who prefer not to be identified, information can be passed to police anonymously by calling Crimestoppers on 0800 555111.'

Posters publicising the new appeal for information are to be put up in Shrewsbury, Leominster, Ludlow and Melverley in coming days. Trevor Bradley's death has been subject to regular review by the force. A small and dedicated team of officers has spent 12 months carefully examining the papers relating to this case to see what new investigative opportunities could be identified. The murder of Shropshire rose-grower Hilda Murrell, who died in 1984 was detected 21 years later, when Andrew George was convicted at Stafford Crown Court in 2005 of her kidnap and murder. His conviction followed a cold case review by the force and advances in forensic techniques.

Trevor Bradley's body was found in his burned out white, J-registered Vauxhall Nova car on the afternoon of April 27, 1994. The car was found in a field off a lane between the hamlets of Crosslanes and Kinnerley, near the village of Melverley, Shropshire. The car had been seen on fire in the spot earlier in the day. Mr Bradley was seen in Middletown Square, Monkmoor and in Shrewsbury town centre the afternoon before his body was found, on 26th April 1994. Some witnesses also reported seeing him at the bingo hall in Leominster later that evening but police enquiries at the time of his death were unable to confirm the sightings.



Tenth Annual Archaeology Symposium

Herefordshire residents will have an opportunity to find out about archaeological discoveries in the county at a one day symposium, which is being held at the Courtyard Theatre on Saturday, 10th November.

Herefordshire Council's County Archaeology service is hosting the event called 'The Past With Us: Archaeology in Herefordshire 2007.'

The day will reflect a busy year for the archaeology service and will, amongst other items, look at the new national gas pipeline, Rotherwas Access Road, the flood alleviation works in Hereford City and the results of an aerial survey project.

Dr Keith Ray, County Archaeologist, said, 'This year has been an interesting one for the service and discoveries such as the Rotherwas Ribbon and the excavations being carried out at Credenhill Iron Age Hill Fort have attracted national attention. This day gives county residents a chance to find out more about the discoveries made and I hope that interested people will come along.'

Tickets for the event, which starts at 9.20am, are £6 or £10 to include a light lunch and can be booked by logging onto www.courtyard.org.uk or by telephoning 0870 1122330.



Pedicargo launches service to businesses

Following a successful eight week trial with Herefordshire Council when 2,500 files and building samples were transported across Hereford, Hereford's new pedicargo service has now launched to other businesses in the city.

Representatives from city businesses attended a special launch night at Green Café in St Owen's Street, where they were able to see the pedicargo vehicles, hear about its successful trial and have any questions on the service answered. Herefordshire Council has used the pedicargo service over the past eight weeks to transport planning files which are requested by members of the public.

Anthony Sawyer, Herefordshire Council's senior archivist, said that using the pedicargo service benefited the council both in cost saving and reduced impact on the environment. Prior to the service being available, members of council staff would have to drive their own vehicle to deliver these items. The return to the council in both staff productivity and reduced impact on the environment will now be tracked to compile exact statistics on saved carbon emissions, improved productivity and reduced labour cost.

Continued . . .


Michael Hainge, Herefordshire Council's Director of the Environment, with Will Vaughan and
Ben Matthews, joint owners of Hereford Pedicabs.

The service to the public has improved because, as long as files were requested before 10.30am, they were delivered to Garrick House within an hour, whereas before it would be the following morning. 'Our customer services staff have been delighted with the new courier because it means they can help the public to access what they want both quickly and efficiently and this helps to further improve the service they offer,' Anthony said.

Will Vaughan and Ben Matthews, who run the Pedicargo business, are aiming to provide a sustainable, pedal powered, zero emission cargo service to businesses and the local authority in Herefordshire, which will operate under their core values of keeping things fun, green and honest. With the backing of Herefordshire Council's sustainable transport team, the Pedicabs will also be advertising the council on their Pedicargo vehicles, which will have a secure container for transporting boxes of documents.

Pedicargo riders are able to haul up to a quarter of a ton on their specialist bikes. The cycle networks allow quick and efficient access to council buildings and many industrial estates, enabling them to bypass the problems of road congestion in Hereford.

Councillor Brian Wilcox, Herefordshire Council's cabinet member for highways and transportation, said, 'We have been pleased with the trial and are now working out detailed figures on the benefits it offers both in terms of costs and providing a better service to the public. We then hope to be able to extend the service to other council departments.'

Will Vaughan said, 'Not only can we do quick, efficient, same day delivery, we can reduce the cost to a business of sending a member of staff across town with a parcel, thus increasing productivity whilst providing an environmentally friendly and fun way of transporting goods.'

Any company interested in using the pedicargo service is asked to contact Will Vaughan on 07718320195 or email will@herefordpedicabs.com.

No money or valuables will be carried on the Pedicargo vehicles.


The Herefordshire Council sponsorship sticker on the rear of one of the pedicargo vehicles.

Councillor Brian Wilcox, Herefordshire Council's Cabinet Member for Highways and Transportation,
tries out one of the pedicargo vehicles, watched by Will Vaughan.

Council Receives Grant from DEFRA

Herefordshire Council has been given a financial helping hand from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to support its work with local social enterprises involved in reuse and recycling.

The council has been awarded a £9,459 grant from Defra's waste implementation programme support fund. The handout will be used to help the voluntary and community organizations in Herefordshire and Worcestershire that the council works in partnership with to reduce waste. The organizations include: Full House, a furniture recycling service based at Holme Lacy Industrial Estate, and Herefordshire Lifestyles, based at Berrington Street, Hereford. Herefordshire Lifestyles, a charity which offers training and support to adults with disabilities, turns unwanted electrical appliances into quality refurbished goods for resale.

Chris Atkinson, Worcestershire County Council's Project Development Officer for reuse said, 'The funding will help to showcase the work of organizations who reuse and recycle unwanted electrical equipment, pass on furniture to people on low incomes, refurbish discarded bicycles, reuse paint, recycle computers and more. It is hoped this funding will raise awareness of local social enterprises involved in reuse and recycling, particularly with local businesses, who may be unaware of the opportunities available for working with this sector.'

The grant will also fund two visits aimed at enabling the council and its partners to learn from other organizations around the UK who are currently exhibiting best practice in this field. The final part of the funding will pay for a small study to identify reusable or recyclable waste currently not being reused or recycled in the two counties.

If you would like to find out more about reuse organizations or obtaining a free reuse guide, please call 01905 766883 or visit www.wastemissionimpossible.org.uk.



Local policing road shows prove a success

The two Local Policing Teams based at Peterchurch Police Station in Herefordshire are continuing a successful programme of road shows aimed at boosting community safety knowledge. The Golden Valley officers held a ‘Safety Road Show’ back in June at Peterchurch, while the Hereford Rural South team have organized a further couple of road shows at Orcop and Little Dewchurch.

The road shows have allowed the communities in each area to have direct engagement with their Local Policing Teams, as well as being able to take away invaluable crime prevention advice and literature. In addition, each event has featured displays and presentations from Hereford & Worcester Fire and Rescue service on fire safety, while details were given of the Smartwater property marking system, which is the latest weapon the police are endorsing to combat crime. The events also gave the local parishes the chance to update their websites and parish plans, as well as gather support for Neighbourhood Watch and other schemes.

Numbers for both of the recent events at Little Dewchurch and Orcop were good - especially considering the onset of dark evenings and autumnal weather. Sergeant Robin Davies explained, 'These road shows are in their infancy but they have been well-received, so we are looking for them to grow both in number and content. We are actively seeking to make the next one better than the last. The road shows help us to engage with communities that may not have previously seen too much of the police because they have relatively low crime levels and there have been fewer calls made to us. I hope our presence, time and attention at these road shows will reassure those communities that we do care and are trying to engage with as many people and areas as we can and, quite rightly, that should not always be after a crime has occurred!'

'We are looking to advise people of a variety of crime prevention initiatives as well as keeping themselves and their property safe, which is why we have involved the other agencies,' added Sgt Davies. 'I would like to thank all those responsible for assisting with the evenings and the presentations and also all those members of the public who attended. I hope they found the events both useful and reassuring.'

Future venues and dates are being explored, but the next road show takes place at Clehonger Village Hall on Wednesday, 24th October at 7.00pm. All are welcome to the event hosted by Clehonger Parish Council and refreshments will be available.


The Hereford Rural South Local Policing Team with their information display at one of the road shows. PC Andrew Bundy, CSO Fiona Witcher, Sergeant Robin Davies and CSO Kevin Powell.

Composting Clinics to the Rescue

Herefordshire Council is once again coming to the aid of all those residents struggling with their composting.

A series of free Composting Clinics has been organized throughout Herefordshire, for residents that don't know their wormeries from their mulch. The clinics provide practical support and advice to anyone who is having problems with their compost bin and will answer any questions for those who are thinking of buying a bin.

This should come in very handy for the thousands of residents that are still actively using the 71,000 compost bins bought since 2004 at a subsidized rate through the Herefordshire and Worcestershire composting scheme.

Composting experts will be on hand to prescribe treatment to solve any compost ailments and help make better compost. During the event there will be displays on how to make compost as well as an opportunity to get individual advice.

Viktoria Salisbury, project development officer for composting, said, 'Composting is really important to the waste reduction team at the council, as it is a great way of reducing the amount biodegradable waste which gets sent to landfill. We want to try to help anyone still having trouble with their composting so that we can ensure that residents continue to use their compost bins to their full potential.'

Anybody who would like further information should call the Mission Impossible hotline on 01905 766883 or visit www.wastemissionimpossible.org.

The clinics will be taking place as follows:

Friday, 19th October - Composting Bus, Hereford High Town - 10am until 3.30pm.
Saturday, 20th October - Composting bus, Morrisons Store, Ross-on-Wye - 10am until 3pm.
Monday, 22nd October - Composting Bus, Corn Square, Leominster - 10am until 3pm.
Tuesday, 23rd October - Composting Bus, St. Katherine's Car Park, Ledbury - 10am until 3pm.
Wednesday, 24th October - Composting Bus, Kington High Street car park - 10am until Noon.
Wednesday, 24th October - Composting Bus, Tenbury Road Car Park, Bromyard - 1pm until 3pm.



Council Leader's Dismay and Disappointment at Darling's Announcement

The leader of Herefordshire Council has greeted the recent announcement of the government's Comprehensive Spending Review with dismay and disappointment.

In line with national opinion, Councillor Roger Phillips believes the government's review of its finances, which details, amongst other things how much investment the government is to make in local councils during the coming years was a missed opportunity.

'This was bad news for local councils and signals above inflation rises in council tax bills and does nothing to help the gap in funding for services to elderly people, the fastest growing sector of the population in Herefordshire,' said councillor Phillips, after Alistair Darling's announcement in parliament on Tuesday, 9th October.

During his speech, the Chancellor announced a fair and affordable settlement for local councils worth £26 billion a year by 2010, and promised one per cent growth on top of inflation. He also indicated that Government wants local councils to find a further £4.9 billion in efficiency savings by 2011 by smarter procurement.

However, in response Sir Simon Milton, Chairman of the Local Government Association, an umbrella organization which represents local councils nationally, said, 'This is the worst settlement for local government in a decade. Councils will continue to work hard for the people they serve but they face tough choices. The Chancellor's announcement will mean above inflation rises in bills for council taxpayers and businesses, and there remains a black hole in funding for the care of the elderly.'

Councillor Phillips said, 'In real terms, this means we will get an increase in money from Government of one per cent above inflation. This is a missed opportunity for Government to significantly help local councils provide the services their communities need and deserve. We have already made efficiency savings to the tune of £7.72 million and have identified a further £4.01 million in further efficiency savings in this financial year. This announcement is not good news and we are left fearing the worst when Government announces the settlements for each individual council in December.'



Repairs to Flood Hit Highways Well Under Way

Repair works are well under way on Herefordshire's highways that were damaged during the floods of July and it is hoped that all of the repairs will be completed by the end of the year.

The response to the damage on our roads, estimated to cost £2.5 million in total, will take quite some effort on the part of Herefordshire Council and its partners and will inevitably mean that some other schemes will have to be rescheduled. The cost of the repair works will be recovered from Central Government, through a variety of funding schemes.

Despite the flooding, Herefordshire Council does intend to deliver all of the works that it had planned for this financial year, so any rescheduling will be within the financial year, as far as it is humanly possible to do so.

Councillor Brian Wilcox, Herefordshire Council's cabinet member for highways and transportation, said, 'We are also aware that, despite our extensive efforts to identify all damage, we do have in excess of 2,000 miles of roads and some damage may not have found its way onto our list of works. If anyone is concerned about damage to our roads, or wishes to report any issue relating to the highways, please do so by using our streetcare line 01432 261800 or send an e-mail to streets@herefordshire.gov.uk and we will do our utmost to get it fixed.'



Design Service is Top Drawer

'Done the logo, done the flier, hopefully I can now do other things on my own,' was just one of the really positive comments from a participant on the Voluntary Action Design Service (VADS), which has successfully gained Herefordshire Partnership funding to continue until March 2008.

VADS is a free, one to one service which helps voluntary and community groups to produce newsletters, posters and fliers to attract volunteers using MS Publisher or MS Word. Since the service began in June, 24 individuals from groups like WRVS Meals on Wheels and Campaign for the Protection of Rural England have been helped to produce material that is fit for purpose, reads well and looks good.

Other comments have been equally enthusiastic:

· 'I am now almost looking forward to doing the next newsletter, although I think I may have trouble deciding how jazzy to make it!'
·'Clare was brilliant, patient and understanding. A perfect tutor to run this scheme'
·'I was able to finish a brochure I am currently working on and take it home. A brilliant idea.'
·' I liked the one to one, hands on help and encouragement.'
·'I will now have more user friendly publicity for board members and volunteers etc.'

If you would like to view some examples of the work produced, please feel free to visit http://www.herefordshireva.org/voluntary_action_design_service or see the Wall of Fame in the HVA offices.

The two hour personalized sessions take place at HVA offices in Berrows Business Centre, Hereford, and aim to give people the confidence to be creative in their approach to publicity and marketing, whilst passing on their skills to others.

If you would further information or need a booking form, telephone Clare O'Grady on 01432 343 932 or email outreach@herefordshireva.org.



Council Launches 'Text a Home' Service

Herefordshire Council is making it easier for residents to register their interest in empty homes by 'text' bidding on their mobile telephones. The Home Point partnership between the council and a number of local housing associations, has launched a new text line, 0778 148 2313 to allow people to bid for properties 24 hours a day, seven days a week and get an immediate confirmation that their bid has been registered.

Home Point manages one central register for all those interested in finding a housing association home in Herefordshire. Everybody accepted onto the register is entitled to apply for the empty homes that are advertised every week.

Jamie Burns, Home Point manager, said, 'This innovative service gives residents a faster and more flexible service so that out of normal office hours they have the option of bidding for properties with a text message. The service has only been running for a week and we are getting a very positive response. Our customers love it. The service is very easy to use. Residents simply text their registration number, along with the property reference from our range of advertised properties, and the bids are processed the following day. It makes us much more accessible and efficient as a service and it frees up more of our time to be able to concentrate on our more vulnerable applicants who need a bit of extra help.'

Calls are charged at the standard rate and Home Point does not receive an income from the service. Home Point recognizes that although the service is likely to prove popular, it is not for everyone. If they prefer, residents can still use the Home Point website, where they can download an application form to register, browse available homes and apply for properties. Alternatively, they can phone the service on 01432 359500 or call into the offices at 135 Eign Street, Hereford.

For further information, please call Herefordshire Council on 01432 260006.



Sustainable Communities Conference

Herefordshire Council has joined forces with The Co-operative Group and the Robert Owen Society to stage a Sustainable Communities conference. The conference is to be held at The Shire Hall, Hereford, on Wednesday, 31st October and aims to help develop sustainable communities in the Marches region through co-operative ideals and principles.

Key speakers will be Mr Tor Justad from the Highlands and Islands Community Energy Company and Dr Len Arthur, who will focus on the importance of community enterprise. There will also be workshops exploring the ideas discussed and a Market Place area where local community, voluntary, co-operative and social enterprise groups will display their services.

Geoff Hughes, Herefordshire Council's Director of Adult and Community Services, said, 'It is in all of our interests to develop communities that can survive in this changing political and economic environment. This conference is part of a series of annual events and will allow people to come together and share ideas about the best way forward.'

To book a place on the conference, which is free of charge, email ahorsburgh@robertowen.org or telephone 01568 615510. The conference will run between 9am and 3.30pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.



Extension Approved for Pandy Inn, Dorstone

Planning permission for an extension at the Pandy Inn, Dorstone, to provide kitchen stores, toilets and owners' bedrooms, together with a new building to provide eight guest rooms and two staff bedrooms has been approved by the southern area planning subcommittee.

The medieval Pandy Inn is set in the heart of Dorstone conservation area. Five letters of objection were received, concerned by insufficient parking, the effect the extension will have on neighbouring properties, drainage problems and the impact on an Ancient Monument Site and the integrity of the inn.

Six letters in support were also received, saying the pub was a vital part of Dorstone life and the works were needed to maintain its viability. The application was approved, with conditions, at a meeting held on Wednesday, 10th October.



Outline Planning Permission Agreed for Ewyas Harold Site

Outline planning permission to allow residential development on a field opposite Lower House, Pontrilas Road, Ewyas Harold, has been approved by members of the southern area planning subcommittee.

Two letters of objection were received, concerned at loss of privacy and saying care was needed with re-routed footpaths. They also felt it needed to be frontage development. The site is wholly within the village envelope for Ewyas Harold and is one of the few remaining areas for residential development as defined by the Unitary Development Plan.



Take Part in The Big Draw at Half Term

As part of the national Big Draw campaign, Herefordshire Libraries are hosting a series of events during the half term period which runs from Monday, 22nd October until Friday, 26th October.

On Tuesday, 23rd October, between 11am and 3pm, a drawing themed treasure trove will be held in The Woolhope Room at Hereford Library. There will be a host of activities for families and a chance to discover a tantalizing treasure, sketch it and make a print of the treasure. Visitors can also create a treasure box to take home and contribute to a treasure wall hanging which will go on permanent display in the new Hereford Museum Resource and Learning Centre.

Also on Tuesday, 23rd October, Ross-on-Wye Heritage Centre is holding a 'Bedecked and Bejewelled' event where boys and girls will be able to draw jewellery and make some funky body ornaments. This free event runs between 10am and 12.30pm. Children are welcome to drop in at any session but must be accompanied by an adult.

On Wednesday, 24th October between 10am and 12:30pm, 'Jewellery from Roman times to Victorian times' will feature at the Bedecked and Bejewelled event at Hereford Museum and Art Gallery. Here youngsters will also have the opportunity to draw a range of jewellery and make some of their own.

Ledbury Heritage Centre is hosting Bedecked and Bejewelled on Thursday, 25th October, when children can draw and make jewellery.

Siriol Collins, Herefordshire Council's Heritage Learning Officer said, 'The Big Draw campaign encourages people to use drawing as a way to engage with the past, present and future. We are fortunate in having many wonderful treasures at our centres throughout the county and we hope many people will come along and try their hand at drawing some of them.'



Youth Service Plans Ghoulish Activities for Hallowe'en

Young people in South Wye will be getting geared up for this year's Hallowe'en as the council's youth workers bring some ghoulish plans to fruition this month.

The last couple of weeks have seen a frenzy of activity as the team prepares for two FREE events which promise to make the blood run cold. There will be an evening of Hallowe'en fun for the boys' group on Monday, 29th October and one for the girls' group on Wednesday, 31st October, the big night itself.

All sorts of dark, chilling, spooky materials have been purchased, including spiders' webs, black paint and scary, disgusting blood type stuff. Those brave enough to join in the fun will be making Hallowe'en masks to take home and scare their families and friends with. They will also get the chance to play some devilish games, such as wrap up a mummy with toilet roll.

On a lighter note, the cookery book will be coming out and an array of yummy Hallowe'en inspired food will be cooked and prepared, including cheesy broomsticks, spider cakes and witches' brew, (snakes compulsory).

Councillor Jenny Hyde, Cabinet Member for Children and Young People, said, 'Our youth workers are great at rising to the occasion and providing lots of exciting activities for our young people. They are always coming up with new ideas. I particularly like the idea of spider cakes and witches' brew. It's a great way for young people to enjoy Hallowe'en activities with their friends in a safe and caring environment. I'm sure both events will be great successes.'



New Procedures for Keeping Children Safe in Herefordshire

More than 120 professionals from agencies and organizations who work with children across the county came together last week to launch new procedures for keeping the county's children safe.

Following a number of tragic cases nationally, including the sad story of neglect which resulted in the death of eight year old Victoria Climbie in 2001, child protection and safeguarding has become an issue for all organizations working with children. 'Every Child Matters' which was launched by the government in 2004, changed the way organizations work, putting the child at the centre with the onus on organizations to work together to share information and provide a seamless support service.

In Herefordshire there are many agencies and organizations who work with children and have a role to protect them. The list includes schools, health visitors, school nurses, social workers, nurseries, playgroups, after school clubs, police and general practitioners. Levels of concern for a child's safety can vary greatly from the subtle things that go on in the family community which require family support to the more extreme issues, requiring direct intervention from the authorities.

The new interagency child protection procedures for safeguarding children have been put together by the Herefordshire Safeguarding Children Board. The Board is made up of representatives from local and regional agencies who work with children. The procedures are available online and have been designed for quick and easy access. Content is comprehensive and gives clear guidance on all possible scenarios, including procedures for managing individual cases, defining and recognizing abuse and neglect, information sharing, confidentiality and dealing with children in specific circumstances. It also gives guidance on issues surrounding bullying which is a growing concern nationally.

Councillor Jenny Hyde, Cabinet Member for Children and Young People said, 'This is a very important document which has taken over a year to put together. We have to be very clear about the way we work together and not allow any loop holes which could result in child protection not being addressed appropriately. Key officers have been briefed by the Safeguarding Children Board to make sure they know where to find the procedures and how to use them.'

The procedures are available through the Council's website for members of the public on www.herefordshire.gov.uk/hscb_SafeguardingChildrenProcedures.



Council Publishes Youth Survey

Herefordshire Council has just published the findings of one of the biggest surveys of young people ever conducted across the county. More than 2,000 13 to 18 year olds returned a questionnaire aimed at getting young people's views about the services they use in the county.

Information was gathered on a whole range of issues, including the opportunities for young people to influence important local decisions. Overall, 31 percent of young people who responded felt they could influence important local decisions and that Herefordshire Council gives young people enough opportunity to do so. This shows a large improvement as only 19 percent responded positively to this issue in a survey undertaken in 2005.

The results show that young people want to have a say in the future of their county. If a major new development was planned in Herefordshire, such as new leisure or shopping facilities, 64 percent would want to have a say on the matter. The survey asked what activities young people do in their spare time on a weekly, monthly and annual basis. Three percent were very satisfied with what there is to do in Herefordshire, whereas 42 percent said they were satisfied but thought that some improvements could be made. Fifty-eight percent stated that there were activities they wanted to do but were not available, such as ice-skating / ice hockey, cinema and sports clubs / grounds.

The information gathered will be used by council departments, Herefordshire Community Youth Service, Connexions and other organizations throughout the county to improve services used by young people. In some areas, work has begun already:

In a teenage lifestyle survey published earlier this year, the issue of bullying was flagged up as an area of concern. In order to understand the issue better, more detailed questions were included on bullying in the youth survey. The findings revealed that 24 percent of young people say they have been bullied in the last 12 months, most of them at school or college. Just over half of those bullied had asked for help, mostly from a teacher with 39 percent saying this resulted in the bullying stopping.

'Bullying is a problem nationally and Herefordshire is no exception,' said Dennis Longmore, Manager of Social Inclusion. 'It creates misery, attacks lifestyles, health and personal development, so it is important we have policies about how to deal with it. We have been working with schools for some time to help them tackle bullying and are consulting on a new anti bullying policy for the county which includes sections on cyberbullying. The final version will be distributed at a special anti bullying conference scheduled in February for all organizations who work with young people. Clearly, we are not complacent in any way where bullying is concerned.

Councillor Jenny Hyde, Cabinet Member for Children and Young People said, 'The youth survey has provided us with a wealth of information which we can not only use in our own service planning, but also to help other agencies working with young people know what their needs are. We know that bullying is one of the biggest concerns parents have about their children's safety and well-being, particularly at school. It is also one of the top concerns of children and young people themselves.

Schools and others who work with young people need to be able to identify the signs of bullying and tackle it head on when it occurs. The Herefordshire survey shows that most young people who report the incident, find it is treated so seriously that it stops, but this isn't always the case. We need to make sure young people are taken seriously and can trust the adults they are working with to help them.'



Herefordshire Praised for Funding Success

Herefordshire Council's funding experts have helped secure £14 million in Heritage Lottery Fund grants over the last five years with 172 separate awards. The funding officers helped communities to develop good quality applications, which have been more successful in recent years.

Herefordshire was identified in 2002 as a 'priority development area' by the West Midlands region of the Heritage Lottery Fund because of levels of deprivation in some areas of the county, its rural isolation and the fact that it had a low level of Heritage Lottery funding previously. In 2002 the funding per person for Herefordshire was £10.42 below the national average but by 2007 it had increased to £12.61 above the national average.

Anne Jenkins, regional manager for the Heritage Lottery Fund, commented, 'The increase in awards would not have been possible without the dedication and professionalism of the council's funding officers who have been instrumental in promoting and supporting projects throughout the whole of the county. We are pleased to see that after the concentrated work over the last five years, Herefordshire is no longer identified as a priority development area and has, in fact, become one of the most successful local authorities within the region in terms of accessing Heritage Lottery funding.'

Out of the 172 Heritage Lottery Fund awards in Herefordshire over the last five years, recent highlights are the £1.2million grant to help extend Hereford's Friar Street Museum, to include a new learning centre, and the £4.2 million awarded to restore Hereford's Cathedral Close. Other projects include grants to the Leominster Folk Museum, to promote reminiscences of life in the market town, and the Longtown Historical Society, where money was won to record farming memories in the Golden Valley.

Councillor Adrian Blackshaw, cabinet member for economic development and community services said, 'The council's efforts to secure funding for important projects often goes on behind the scenes. It is gratifying to see recognition for the hard work and success of employees who are experienced in working with our partners and the community to create high quality applications for Heritage Lottery funding, which provide a lasting benefit to the community.'

Clare Wichbold of Herefordshire Council's community regeneration team, said, 'We have really enjoyed working on a wide range of heritage projects and working with some wonderful people in the process. The support of the Heritage Lottery Fund has made such a strong difference to what we have been able to achieve in Herefordshire.'



Restore Your Orchard with Council's Fruit Kit Scheme

Anyone in Herefordshire seeking to restore an old orchard or trying to trace traditional local varieties of apples should look no further than Herefordshire Council's Fruit Kit Scheme. Run by the council's Parks, Countryside and Leisure Development service, the scheme is now in its ninth year and sources old fruit varieties, many of which were first raised by local fruit producers.

Varieties on offer for orchards this year include cooking apple Queen Alexandra, first raised by William Crump at the Madresfield Court Estate near Malvern. This apple cooks to a brisk yet rich puree which makes the perfect apple sauce. Dessert varieties, Blue Pearmain and Channel Beauty are also available for orchards, as are the dual purpose Bardsey Island, Siddington Russet and Captain Tom, which was sourced by Frank P. Matthews many years ago from Geoffrey Knight at Colwall.

Garden varieties are also on offer and include Bardsey Island, cooking apple, Catshead and dessert apples Cissy and King Coffee. The trees will be on sale at Queenswood Country Park, Dinmore Hill, from 10am until 3pm on Saturday, 24th and Sunday, 25th November.

James Bisset, Herefordshire Council's principal countryside officer, said, 'The Fruit Tree Kit scheme offers a great opportunity to source these rare varieties and keep the bud stock growing for future generations to propagate and enjoy. Each variety has its own distinct taste and offers a real treat for the tastebuds when compared with mass produced apples which are on sale in supermarkets. Unusually, Bardsey Island has a strong lemon scent while King Coffee, which was first exhibited in 1934, has a distinct aroma of freshly brewed coffee!

This year I have included something different, a variety called Langley Bullace, which is a bullace-damson cross. Both of these are cultivated forms of wild plum and the round blue-black fruit are ideal for cooking, preserves, jams and compotes.'

The kits, which include a tree supplied as a 'one year maiden,' along with a tree tie cost just £9 each, whether you purchase those budded on to M25 vigorous rootstock suitable for orchards or those on M26/M9 rootstock, which results in 10ft garden sized trees.

A leaflet with further information on all the varieties available can be downloaded from: www.herefordshire.gov.uk/Fruittrees.

Trees can be ordered in advance by contacting James Bisset, telephone 01432 260848 or email jbisset@herefordshire.gov.uk. All advance orders must be received by Saturday, 17th November and trees must be collected from Queenswood Country Park.



Repairs to Flood Hit Highways Well Under Way

Repair works are well under way on Herefordshire's highways that were damaged during the floods of July and it is hoped that all of the repairs will be completed by the end of the year.

The response to the damage on our roads, estimated to cost £2.5 million in total, will take quite some effort on the part of Herefordshire Council and its partners and will inevitably mean that some other schemes will have to be rescheduled. The cost of the repair works will be recovered from Central Government, through a variety of funding schemes.

Despite the flooding, Herefordshire Council does intend to deliver all of the works that it had planned for this financial year, so any rescheduling will be within the financial year, as far as it is humanly possible to do so.

Councillor Brian Wilcox, Herefordshire Council's cabinet member for highways and transportation, said, 'We are also aware that, despite our extensive efforts to identify all damage, we do have in excess of 2,000 miles of roads and some damage may not have found its way onto our list of works. If anyone is concerned about damage to our roads, or wishes to report any issue relating to the highways, please do so by using our streetcare line 01432 261800 or send an e-mail to streets@herefordshire.gov.uk and we will do our utmost to get it fixed.'



Design Service is Top Drawer

'Done the logo, done the flier, hopefully I can now do other things on my own,' was just one of the really positive comments from a participant on the Voluntary Action Design Service (VADS), which has successfully gained Herefordshire Partnership funding to continue until March 2008.

VADS is a free, one to one service which helps voluntary and community groups to produce newsletters, posters and fliers to attract volunteers using MS Publisher or MS Word. Since the service began in June, 24 individuals from groups like WRVS Meals on Wheels and Campaign for the Protection of Rural England have been helped to produce material that is fit for purpose, reads well and looks good.

Other comments have been equally enthusiastic:

· 'I am now almost looking forward to doing the next newsletter, although I think I may have trouble deciding how jazzy to make it!'
·'Clare was brilliant, patient and understanding. A perfect tutor to run this scheme'
·'I was able to finish a brochure I am currently working on and take it home. A brilliant idea.'
·' I liked the one to one, hands on help and encouragement.'
·'I will now have more user friendly publicity for board members and volunteers etc.'

If you would like to view some examples of the work produced, please feel free to visit http://www.herefordshireva.org/voluntary_action_design_service or see the Wall of Fame in the HVA offices.

The two hour personalized sessions take place at HVA offices in Berrows Business Centre, Hereford, and aim to give people the confidence to be creative in their approach to publicity and marketing, whilst passing on their skills to others.

If you would further information or need a booking form, telephone Clare O'Grady on 01432 343 932 or email outreach@herefordshireva.org.



Council Launches 'Text a Home' Service

Herefordshire Council is making it easier for residents to register their interest in empty homes by 'text' bidding on their mobile telephones. The Home Point partnership between the council and a number of local housing associations, has launched a new text line, 0778 148 2313 to allow people to bid for properties 24 hours a day, seven days a week and get an immediate confirmation that their bid has been registered.

Home Point manages one central register for all those interested in finding a housing association home in Herefordshire. Everybody accepted onto the register is entitled to apply for the empty homes that are advertised every week.

Jamie Burns, Home Point manager, said, 'This innovative service gives residents a faster and more flexible service so that out of normal office hours they have the option of bidding for properties with a text message. The service has only been running for a week and we are getting a very positive response. Our customers love it. The service is very easy to use. Residents simply text their registration number, along with the property reference from our range of advertised properties, and the bids are processed the following day. It makes us much more accessible and efficient as a service and it frees up more of our time to be able to concentrate on our more vulnerable applicants who need a bit of extra help.'

Calls are charged at the standard rate and Home Point does not receive an income from the service. Home Point recognizes that although the service is likely to prove popular, it is not for everyone. If they prefer, residents can still use the Home Point website, where they can download an application form to register, browse available homes and apply for properties. Alternatively, they can phone the service on 01432 359500 or call into the offices at 135 Eign Street, Hereford.

For further information, please call Herefordshire Council on 01432 260006.



Sustainable Communities Conference

Herefordshire Council has joined forces with The Co-operative Group and the Robert Owen Society to stage a Sustainable Communities conference. The conference is to be held at The Shire Hall, Hereford, on Wednesday, 31st October and aims to help develop sustainable communities in the Marches region through co-operative ideals and principles.

Key speakers will be Mr Tor Justad from the Highlands and Islands Community Energy Company and Dr Len Arthur, who will focus on the importance of community enterprise. There will also be workshops exploring the ideas discussed and a Market Place area where local community, voluntary, co-operative and social enterprise groups will display their services.

Geoff Hughes, Herefordshire Council's Director of Adult and Community Services, said, 'It is in all of our interests to develop communities that can survive in this changing political and economic environment. This conference is part of a series of annual events and will allow people to come together and share ideas about the best way forward.'

To book a place on the conference, which is free of charge, email ahorsburgh@robertowen.org or telephone 01568 615510. The conference will run between 9am and 3.30pm. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.



Tenth Annual Archaeology Symposium

Herefordshire residents will have an opportunity to find out about archaeological discoveries in the county at a one day symposium, which is being held at the Courtyard Theatre on Saturday, 10th November.

Herefordshire Council's County Archaeology service is hosting the event called 'The Past With Us: Archaeology in Herefordshire 2007.'

The day will reflect a busy year for the archaeology service and will, amongst other items, look at the new national gas pipeline, Rotherwas Access Road, the flood alleviation works in Hereford City and the results of an aerial survey project.

Dr Keith Ray, County Archaeologist, said, 'This year has been an interesting one for the service and discoveries such as the Rotherwas Ribbon and the excavations being carried out at Credenhill Iron Age Hill Fort have attracted national attention. This day gives county residents a chance to find out more about the discoveries made and I hope that interested people will come along.'

Tickets for the event, which starts at 9.20am, are £6 or £10 to include a light lunch and can be booked by logging onto www.courtyard.org.uk or by telephoning 0870 1122330.



Extension Approved for Pandy Inn, Dorstone

Planning permission for an extension at the Pandy Inn, Dorstone, to provide kitchen stores, toilets and owners' bedrooms, together with a new building to provide eight guest rooms and two staff bedrooms has been approved by the southern area planning subcommittee.

The medieval Pandy Inn is set in the heart of Dorstone conservation area. Five letters of objection were received, concerned by insufficient parking, the effect the extension will have on neighbouring properties, drainage problems and the impact on an Ancient Monument Site and the integrity of the inn.

Six letters in support were also received, saying the pub was a vital part of Dorstone life and the works were needed to maintain its viability. The application was approved, with conditions, at a meeting held on Wednesday, 10th October.



Outline Planning Permission Agreed for Ewyas Harold Site

Outline planning permission to allow residential development on a field opposite Lower House, Pontrilas Road, Ewyas Harold, has been approved by members of the southern area planning subcommittee.

Two letters of objection were received, concerned at loss of privacy and saying care was needed with re-routed footpaths. They also felt it needed to be frontage development. The site is wholly within the village envelope for Ewyas Harold and is one of the few remaining areas for residential development as defined by the Unitary Development Plan.



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